Eliana

I would love to sing really well, I have wanted to since I was a child, yet I am a little tone deaf.

I am not truly tone deaf. I have gotten better plus I really love music. If you are truly tone deaf, it is unlikely you would listen to any music because tone deafness implies you literally cannot differentiate frequencies, like at all, and it is very rare. You may have piss poor relative pitch, but that can be improved with practice. Singing is just like any other instrument.

It just takes practice.

You may not be the next Adele or Pavarotti or whatever, but you can definitely learn how to hold a tune and clearly sing notes in two octaves.

A good timbre is also incredibly important, and it trips a lot of people up because it is seen as something you are born with or not. But this is also something you can improve greatly with practice. Again, you may not ever have the silky smooth voice of Bruno Mars, but you can definitely be better than the average person.

There's a ton of online material on learning how to sing that you can use.

Personal teachers are better, for voice moreso than other instruments because it is more difficult to tell if you are doing something wrong, but if you're just doing it for shits and giggles, youtube is your best bet.

If you feel like you're hopeless, just take heart, you can learn to sing, just like you can learn to dance.

Eliana

I just love the The Chainsmokers ft. Halsey - Closer cover. It really hits the spot. But then I also love the lead singer, his name is Kenton Chen. He has amazing vocal ability, especially with falsetto.

Falsetto is in mechanical sense, about contracting your vocal cords to make your voice much higher. When you try to do a Micky Mouse voice that is falsetto. If a singer is good enough at controlling their falsetto range it can sound very good.

But that takes a ton of practice.

Just as long as you aren't tone deaf.

Time deafness is a physical thing, similar to how colorblindness works, with a lack of certain sensors in their respective organs, if you're tone deaf, you can't learn how to hear tonality, but. That doesn't actually mean you can't sing. You'll just have to learn a different way to tell how on key you are etc.

Singing is 'just' muscle coordination, strength, breathing, memorisation and confidence! Also it helps if your skull is the right shape.

The truth is that while not everybody can be Beyoncé just like they can be an Olympic athlete. Most people can be trained to sing really well just like they can run long distances.

Eliana

There is so much great talent out there that it makes me happy to see people taking interest in it on a larger scale. One thing that I want to mention though is that people always forget about the band, sadly. That whole video was basically improv by the musicians.

Eliana

Look at the musicians. Benny Goodman, Chick Webb, Artie Shaw, Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Count Basie, Jimmie Lunceford, Lionel Hampton are some of the best swing bands and playing their music is a good way to be sucessful.

There's just an insane amount of knowledge that goes into making music sound great.

If you think about most swing bands, everyone in the group has spent between ten years and their entire lives working on learning their instrument, and they all think they have way further to go. How insane is that? Like if you add up the years of experience from like the Gordon Webster septet, it's probably something like a 150 years of playing their instruments.

And they're STILL improving noticeably from year to year.

The key components of Lindy hop music are having the right tempo, swinging the 8th notes, and having four on the floor.

Tempo:

While this will vary depending on the skill of your scene, slow lindy music is typically 100 to 140 BPM, medium tempo music is 140-180 BPM, and fast is 180-220 BPM. Experiment with different tempos and see what your dancers respond to, but also don't stay locked in the same tempo range for ever either, move it around.

Swung Eighth Notes:

I'm assuming you know what these are. If the song doesn't have them, it's not lindy hop music.

Four on the Floor:

Typically lindy hop music has a rhythm section hit on each quarternote.

Four on the floor means that the bass drum is played on every quarter note, however, swing era drummers did a thing called feathering the bass hits, which means they're barely audible - it should be "felt not heard." Most drummers hear the phrase four on the floor and think of the heavy bass sound of disco.

What we mostly hear that generates the feel of lindy hop comes from the walking bass and chunking quarter notes on the guitar (the italic terms are the ones that those musicians would recognize for this concept). While the drummers should feather the bass on every beat, it's important that it's subtle enough that most listeners wouldn't even realize it was happening.

If you watch lindy hop drummers, they're typically hitting the bass drum on every quarter note. Upright bass players and rhythm guitar will also typically be hitting the quarters most of the time.

Eliana

Look at the musicians. Benny Goodman, Chick Webb, Artie Shaw, Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Count Basie, Jimmie Lunceford, Lionel Hampton are some of the best swing bands and playing their music is a good way to be sucessful.

There's just an insane amount of knowledge that goes into making music sound great.

If you think about most swing bands, everyone in the group has spent between ten years and their entire lives working on learning their instrument, and they all think they have way further to go. How insane is that? Like if you add up the years of experience from like the Gordon Webster septet, it's probably something like a 150 years of playing their instruments.

And they're STILL improving noticeably from year to year.

The key components of Lindy hop music are having the right tempo, swinging the 8th notes, and having four on the floor.

Tempo:

While this will vary depending on the skill of your scene, slow lindy music is typically 100 to 140 BPM, medium tempo music is 140-180 BPM, and fast is 180-220 BPM. Experiment with different tempos and see what your dancers respond to, but also don't stay locked in the same tempo range for ever either, move it around.

Swung Eighth Notes:

I'm assuming you know what these are. If the song doesn't have them, it's not lindy hop music.

Four on the Floor:

Typically lindy hop music has a rhythm section hit on each quarternote.

Four on the floor means that the bass drum is played on every quarter note, however, swing era drummers did a thing called feathering the bass hits, which means they're barely audible - it should be "felt not heard." Most drummers hear the phrase four on the floor and think of the heavy bass sound of disco.

What we mostly hear that generates the feel of lindy hop comes from the walking bass and chunking quarter notes on the guitar (the italic terms are the ones that those musicians would recognize for this concept). While the drummers should feather the bass on every beat, it's important that it's subtle enough that most listeners wouldn't even realize it was happening.

If you watch lindy hop drummers, they're typically hitting the bass drum on every quarter note. Upright bass players and rhythm guitar will also typically be hitting the quarters most of the time.